The PQ Archive: ‘The Wicked + The Divine’ #16 Is A None More Goth Love Story

Oh hi, you’re probably wondering what I’m doing posting a review for an old issue of a comic. You see, I’ve decided that it’s time to save all of my reviews from my time at PopOptiq from the website that is just a hollow shell of its former self. Y’see, when the website changed EICs a little more than a year ago, the new editor decided he wanted to make the website more like Buzzfeed and then proceeded to fire most of the staff. He then also claimed copyright ownership of our work.

Well, I know I never signed a contract with you or the previous EIC that said that was okay and my name is on the byline, so…


tumblr_inline_ntagzvsKTd1r77eon_540Written by Kieron Gillen
Art by Leila Del Duca and Mat Lopes (Backup art by Jamie McKelvie and Matthew Wilson)
Letters by Clayton Cowles
Published by Image Comics

“I imagine death so much it feels more like a memory

When’s it going to get me?

In my sleep? Seven feet ahead of me?

If I see it comin’, do I run or do I let it be?”

That particular stanza is from ‘My Shot,’ one of the first songs heard in Lin-Manuel Miranda’s musical Hamilton. While it isn’t very “goth,” it feels like it could apply with this None More Goth issue of The Wicked + The Divineas the focus shifts to The Morrigan for issue 16.

In this issue, the art is done by Leila Del Duca with colors by Mat Lopes. Having seen Del Duca’s work on the Image book Shutter, it was a bit jarring to see her work look so soft and normal. Part of this was because of Lopes’ colors, deciding to take a more grey and softer edge compared to Shutter’s colorist Owen Gieni. The other part is that this is probably the most human story out of all the ones in the “Commercial Suicide” arc so far.

Framed by Baal delivering lunch to The Morrigan with Minerva begging to join him in typical nearly 13-year-old fashion, The Morrigan tells them the story of how Baphomet’s godhood is her doing. The reader then proceeds to meet them as teenagers, then called Marian and Cameron, and flashes several moments of them over the course of two years.

Through the course of their story, we learn that Marian and Cameron were basically big ol’ goth nerds that played Vampire: The Masquerade and painted miniatures. Cameron even has “Welcome to the Black Parade” by My Chemical Romance as his ringtone. However, we also learn that death seems to follow them like a specter. Cameron loses both of his parents in some sort of accident before he becomes a god. Marian was extremely sick when she was Minerva’s age, which probably gives her some of her insight of how she’s chooses to spend her life on “the edge of that pit.” Much like the last issue, it leaves open the question of do some members of the Pantheon just sort of know what they’re going to be before they’re chosen.

While there are some chances for Del Duca to delve into a bit of the weirdness she gets into in Shutter, like The Morrigan being ushered into the world on the backs of ravens and an avatar of Baphomet made entirely out of ketchup, the true strength of her art comes from how expressive she makes the characters. You could take away the word bubbles in so many of the scenes and still have an idea of what’s going on just based on how emotive the faces of the characters were. Mixed with Gillen writing an all-too relatable love story with sad goth nerds, this issue tugs on the heartstrings hard. By the time The Morrigan reaches her hand out to Cameron to offer him a place to be her king, those heartstrings might just be snapped in two entirely.

Of course, not satisfied with being the most None More Goth, Gillen also manages to sneak in one terrible pun, one question that further expands the ongoing mystery of the story, and one screaming cliffhanger. It’s like a perfect Gillen trifecta. Well, that and the call back to one of the first things Laura ever said about The Morrigan in the backup story. Perfect Gillen quadrangle?

While not as explosive and bombastic as previous issues in this arc, the penultimate issue in WicDiv’s “Commercial Suicide” arc succeeds perfectly at what it sets out to be: a tragic teenage goth love story. Between Gillen’s strong and melancholy writing and Del Duca and Lopes’ dark and expressive art, the story of how Marian and Cameron became The Morrigan and Baphomet is one that feels all too real in a surreal universe. Now the question is will Baph continue to run from death or will he let it be?


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The PQ Archive: ‘Pacific Rim: Tales From The Drift’ #1 Is A Memory Best Left Forgotten

Oh hi, you’re probably wondering what I’m doing posting a review for an old issue of a comic. You see, I’ve decided that it’s time to save all of my reviews from my time at PopOptiq from the website that is just a hollow shell of its former self. Y’see, when the website changed EICs a little more than a year ago, the new editor decided he wanted to make the website more like Buzzfeed and then proceeded to fire most of the staff. He then also claimed copyright ownership of our work.

Well, I know I never signed a contract with you or the previous EIC that said that was okay and my name is on the byline, so…


4888006-pr_tftd_01_cov-1Story by Travis Beacham
Written by Joshua Fialkov
Illustrated by Marcos Marz
Colored by Marcelo Maiolo
Lettered by Troy Peteri
Published by Legendary Comics

The Guillermo del Toro 2013 feature Pacific Rim was easily one of the most fun movies to come out in the past few years. Taking influence from tokusatsu, Pacific Rim was an original, optimistic, and diverse action movie where giant monsters were trying to destroy the world and humanity came together to create giant robots to stop them. It embraced its concept wholeheartedly and delivered wonderfully both in story and in visuals.

Unfortunately, the same cannot really be said of the first issue of Pacific Rim: Tales from the Drift.

The second Pacific Rim comic to come out after the graphic novel Tales from Year Zero, Tales from the Drift tells the story of Mark-1 jaeger Tacit Ronin and its pilots Duc and Kaori Jessop. The comic opens in the middle of a fight in 2016, where the Jessops are struggling in a fight with a Kaiju named Itak. As the two fall out of consciousness during their drift, the reader is treated with flashbacks to the incident that caused the two to meet.

There are parts of the comic that are really neat. The panel layout during the fight scenes with Itak is really interesting and keeps a good flow to the comic. Maiolo’s colors are gorgeous and really give atmosphere to the story, especially the reds and blues that surround the Jessops in the Conn-Pod. The Jessops are the true centerpiece of the comic though. With their constant back and forth and old married couple style bickering, it’s easy to see how they became jaeger pilots in the first place and their story will be worth coming back for future issues.

However, everything else about this comic feels kind of phoned in. There’s nothing particularly offensive or terrible about it, but there’s nothing that makes it truly stand out on the comic shelf either. The art by Marz is this weird painterly style that doesn’t seem to commit to details. Well, there are details where it counts, like with the fight with Itak and whenever the Jessops take a hit, but most of the comic feels like it was put through some sort of filter where you can remember the shapes of things and faces, but not quite the details. That would be cool if it just only applied in the drift flashback sequences, but it feels like that for the entire comic.

Plus, there’s nothing visually that distinguishes the Drift from the rest of the comic. Yes, film and comics are different mediums, but it feels like Fialkov and Marz missed a good opportunity to do things with the Drift that the film couldn’t do. Play more with color. Add inconsistencies between how Kaori remembers it versus how Duc remembers it. Put them at risk of “chasing the rabbit” and play with the visuals of memory. Practice some non-linear storytelling as the Jessops bounce around their own memories of each other. Instead, the reader is treated to a bland run of the mill flashback sequence that, while it tells a lot about our pilots, adds nothing to the lore of The Drift. And this is supposed to be the core of the miniseries?

The story also feels a bit weird for a first issue, as if you’re coming into a story already in progress. There’s probably some expectation that you’re already a Pacific Rim fan reading the story, so you don’t need a rundown of how everything works, but to already toss into a losing fight feels strange and like you’ve somehow missed an issue before it. Tales from Year Zero is a graphic novel with mixed reaction from critics and fans alike, but it at least used framing devices to its advantage to tell its story and re-introduce the reader to the universe. Tales from the Drift just feels like it’s resting too hard on the source material.
While there are some potentially interesting characters and nice use of color in the comic, Pacific Rim: Tales from the Drift #1 feels like a whole lot of nothing. It’s visually uninteresting and doesn’t seem to want to take any risks storywise with its core concept. It’s not even empty calories. It’s just a straight empty canteen in the desert that is a world without a sequel to Pacific Rim, and that’s somehow even more disappointing than if that canteen was just filled with Kaiju Blue.


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The PQ Archive: ‘Power Up’ #4 Closes In On Conclusions

Oh hi, you’re probably wondering what I’m doing posting a review for an old issue of a comic. You see, I’ve decided that it’s time to save all of my reviews from my time at PopOptiq from the website that is just a hollow shell of its former self. Y’see, when the website changed EICs a little more than a year ago, the new editor decided he wanted to make the website more like Buzzfeed and then proceeded to fire most of the staff. He then also claimed copyright ownership of our work.

Well, I know I never signed a contract with you or the previous EIC that said that was okay and my name is on the byline, so…


Screen-Shot-2015-10-27-at-5.01.47-PM-2Written by Kate Leth
Illustrated by Matt Cummings
Published by Boom! Studios

Well, it seems like the last issue’s wish for action to pick up has been answered.

The issue opens with Amie’s neighbors Sal and Derek receiving some of Amie’s mail while listening to a silly pop song on the radio. It’s an adorable scene with the happy couple drawn in warm colors by Cummings as Sal takes the trash out. However, it doesn’t last too long when Derek in typical Magical Girl genre fashion gets possessed by some weird space thing to become the monster of the week to draw out our heroes…

Who are doing laundry at Kevin’s place and helping him clean up.

One of Leth’s strengths as a writer has always been the way she does character interactions and friendships. Her Adventure Time graphic novels and her Fresh Romance story “School Spirit”have this in spades. It is the backbone of Power Up! as Sandy, Kevin, and Amie cope with their newfound powers, and Sandy deals with the fallout of her husband finding out. It’s especially strong in this issue as we learn more about Kevin, a former high school jock, who is living in a dirty garage and doesn’t know how to do laundry. Leth  does a great job of showing Kevin as a lovable sweetheart, who doesn’t have it all together without resorting into “dumb former jock” territory. Plus the funniest moments of the issue come from Sandy telling him that she isn’t going to do his laundry for him.

Luckily, these moments weave in really well with the main action against the possessed Derek, who claims that the trio has “stolen” their powers and calls Kevin in his wet costume “The Spirit.” It’s doubtful that he means the iconic Will Eisner character, but if that was true, this comic is already doing better than Frank Miller’s film adaptation.

Most of the fight goes on without Sandy since she’s trying to grab Silas from Amie’s place, but there’s something where Amie’s healing powers team up with Kevin to do the equivalent of Moon Healing Escalation on Derek. This causes more questions about what exactly Amie’s powers are and what exactly is going on, but it was nice to have an action sequence without the Silas Ex Machina.

While Power Up! #4 doesn’t answer a whole lot of questions, it does strengthen the character interactions and the action sequences without compromising one for the other. Cummings’ art mixed with Leth’s natural and warm writing are working in tandem more as the series progresses, which makes this final homestretch even more exciting. With the monsters coming after the trio now resorting to possession, it seems like the story is about to come to a head in the final two issues as the world (and maybe Kevin’s laundry) hangs in the balance.


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The PQ Archive: ‘Memetic’ Is A Traditional Apocalypse Story With Untraditional Twists

Oh hi, you’re probably wondering what I’m doing posting a review for an old issue of a comic. You see, I’ve decided that it’s time to save all of my reviews from my time at PopOptiq from the website that is just a hollow shell of its former self. Y’see, when the website changed EICs a little more than a year ago, the new editor decided he wanted to make the website more like Buzzfeed and then proceeded to fire most of the staff. He then also claimed copyright ownership of our work.

Well, I know I never signed a contract with you or the previous EIC that said that was okay and my name is on the byline, so…


MemeticFIWritten by James Tynion IV
Art by Eryk Donovan
Colors by Adam Guzowski
Letters by Steve Wands
Published by Boom! Studios

It’s the end of the world one more time. Do you feel fine? If you see Good Times Sloth, you just might as you scream and bleed from your eyes.

At least, that’s the conceit behind Memetic, the three issue miniseries by James Tynion IV and Eryk Donovan about the end of the world being triggered by a meme of a sloth giving a thumbs up. Exploring meme theory and how the dispersion of ideas has sped up in the internet age, the miniseries moves as fast as the image does, but it leads to a rather fresh take on the traditional apocalypse story.

The comic follows two major characters over the course of four days as the world falls down. The first is Aaron, a college aged gay man, who is color blind and deaf and manages to avoid the effects of the sloth meme. The second is Marcus Shaw, a retired colonel with macular degeneration, who realizes  that the meme is related to a theory of weaponized memetics he came across in 1996. Right away, having two protagonists with disabilities that don’t fall into the Straight White Guy Savior roles puts an interesting spin on the usual survivor tropes in these kind of situations.

Out of the two major plotlines, most of the emotional investment falls into Aaron’s story. As he tries to survive and find shelter with his boyfriend Ryan, the apocalypse becomes a literal representation of his own feelings of isolation and being an outsider. It seems like the whole world is falling prey to the sloth, but he feels nothing about it in the slightest. It makes his story intimately relatable even though one might not be in his shoes exactly. Well, the isolation part, not the end of the world via memes part. The whole story is well-crafted, but Tynion’s strengths as a writer really come through with Aaron.

Shaw’s plotline plays out like a typical military task force at the end of the world plot, but the extra layer of avoiding an image adds an extra layer of stakes to their mission, especially when the meme starts to evolve to an aural level. Plus the team Shaw and his old colleague Barbara Xiang manage to cobble together out of who’s left in Washington are just so likable that they become a fun cross section between the military task force and the ragtag group of survivors. It makes the weight of their own losses so much worse as the book goes into its conclusion. At least, Shaw is there to set the record straight to his new colleagues about how macular degeneration really works.

As previously mentioned, the book moves really fast, especially into the conclusion that really gives no answers about what’s going on. Judging by the discussion between Tynion and Donovan in the backmatter of the book (which is cleverly presented as an IM conversation), this was deliberate to represent unknown and uncertain futures. Even with that in mind reading over it, it’s still this complete confusing mindwarp with no real answers. That’s probably for the best, all things considered. Still, this is where Donovan’s expressive and visceral art and Adam Guzowski’s searing colors really come into play, reaching their peak as the characters, and the reader realizes what’s going to happen. It’s mindboggling, but heartwrenching all at once.

Even with its breakneck pace and mindbending ending, Memetic is an engaging read. While playing with some familiar tropes to genre, Tynion and Donovan’s modern spin and interesting characters make it one of the freshest apocalypse stories to come around in recent memory. Just don’t fall prey to that well-crafted sloth.


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The PQ Archive: ‘Lumberjanes’ #19 Shines A Brighter Spotlight On April

Oh hi, you’re probably wondering what I’m doing posting a review for an old issue of a comic. You see, I’ve decided that it’s time to save all of my reviews from my time at PopOptiq from the website that is just a hollow shell of its former self. Y’see, when the website changed EICs a little more than a year ago, the new editor decided he wanted to make the website more like Buzzfeed and then proceeded to fire most of the staff. He then also claimed copyright ownership of our work.

Well, I know I never signed a contract with you or the previous EIC that said that was okay and my name is on the byline, so…


Written by Shannon Watters and Kat Leyh
Art by Carolyn Nowak
Colors by Maarta Laiho
Letters by Aubrey Aiese
Published by Boom! Studios

If there is one comics quote that can describe the second issue in the latest Lumberjanes arc, it’ll be that ever-present quote from Matt Fraction’s run of Hawkeye: “Okay. This looks bad.”

April decides in order to get the band back together, she needs to go underwater to the giant merperson music festival and play Harlow and Taylor’s original demo in order to make them remember the good times. If you’re thinking that sounds like a terrible idea, you’re not alone. All of the other Lumberjanes think so as well. Still, April is bound to go forward and teach the power of friendship.

It becomes clear in those moments that this particular arc is about showing April’s major character flaw: her sometimes obsessed singular focus. Jo speaks to this first-hand seeing that she’s known April the longest, which is a great way of showing younger readers that you can still love someone even when they mess up. Still, Ripley’s big puppy dog eyes when she asks Jen if April is going to make them miss the Bandicoot Bacchanal are heart tugging, and Nowak pulls this off wonderfully with her art. Jen seems to be growing as a character since she lets April go off to teach her that she won’t always know what she’s getting into. Mal points out that she sounds like Rosie. She could be right.

Lumberjanes-19-Cover

One of the best parts of this issue were Mal and Molly actually. With April in the focus, everyone’s favorite summer camp couple end up playing more of a commentator role with a running joke about the two of them being super confused about how you can play tapes underwater. Aubrey Aiese’s letters here are pitch perfect, with them getting super small when a character is giving an aside to themselves or big and all caps when a character is exciting or yelling. It’s really effective, especially in an issue where a lot of action happens. There’s also a perfect callback to Mal’s fear of water as she constantly curses it under her breath.

As you’d expect, everything does go wrong for April when a mix up with the tapes leads to her playing a sea serpent battle cry, which brings us to the beginning of the frame device from the beginning of the previous issue. As April admits she may have screwed things up, it leaves the reader wondering just how she’s getting out of this one.

With the new creative team getting a little further in, Lumberjanes #19 is a fun issue that gets more action into the arc. The focus on April gives a little more substance to the good and bad sides of her character, but there are also great little moments in the art and with the other Lumberjanes as well. It’ll be fun to see how this arc concludes next month.


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The PQ Archive: ‘The Wicked + The Divine’ #15 Is All About Problematic Faves And Personal Tragedy

Oh hi, you’re probably wondering what I’m doing posting a review for an old issue of a comic. You see, I’ve decided that it’s time to save all of my reviews from my time at PopOptiq from the website that is just a hollow shell of its former self. Y’see, when the website changed EICs a little more than a year ago, the new editor decided he wanted to make the website more like Buzzfeed and then proceeded to fire most of the staff. He then also claimed copyright ownership of our work.

Well, I know I never signed a contract with you or the previous EIC that said that was okay and my name is on the byline, so…


TheWickedAndTheDivine_15-1_263_405_s_c1Written by Kieron Gillen
Art by Stephanie Hans (Backup art by Jamie McKelvie and Matthew Wilson)
Letters by Clayton Cowles
Published by Image Comics

Another month, another issue of The Wicked + The Divine with a lot to process. Luckily, no one tragically dies or gets locked up in this issue, but it doesn’t make it any less sad.

Kicking off the second half of the “Commercial Suicide” arc is an issue about Amaterasu with art by Stephanie Hans. If you’re familiar with Hans’ work on Marvel’s multiple Angela series, you know how gorgeous and painterly it is. It’s especially true here, with the way she plays with light and color during the flashbacks and the confrontation between Cassandra and Amaterasu. It’s hard to imagine a better artist for this particular part of the story.

In the flashbacks, we learn that Amaterasu was a girl named Emi going through a “Druid” phase and going by Hazel. Obsessed with the video game Okami and its hero Amaterasushe bites a school bully, who tries to steal her plushie of the goddess in wolf form. Immediately, this informs so much of her character and wraps back around to the first issue where she declared, “You spend your whole life thinking you’re special, and then suddenly you are.” Emi/Hazel always wanted to be a goddess, and now she is one with limited time left.

The whole issue goes back to the central debate around Amaterasu’s character since she was first introduced: is she appropriating Japanese culture by being a white girl with the powers of an ancient Japanese sun goddess? The answer is ultimately “yes.” It’s very clear after this issue that Amaterasu is working with something of a basic understanding of the culture her new found god status comes from. She also gets massively angry as seen with the opening scene and her argument turned superhero fight with Cassandra.

This doesn’t mean that Amaterasu is a bad person. In fact, out of the entire Pantheon, she might be the most gentle and kind-hearted out of all of them. She also happens to be that girl we all knew in high school, who was a  well-intentioned, but kind of misguided anime fan who wanted to move to Japan after college. Maybe the 17-year-old would grow out of it with time, but that’s the last thing she has. She’s trying so hard for what time she has left to mean something, especially when she’s all that she has left in the world with her best friends and her father being dead, but you know what they say about good intentions.

Cassandra and Amaterasu never come to any certain agreement, which tends to happen when you have two strong and conflicting personalities like them getting into an argument, especially over appropriation vs. appreciation, but they seem to have a quiet moment of mutual respect when Ammy admits that she’s admired Cass’s work for a while and Cass realizes that so much of the Pantheon were all fans. While probably laying the groundwork for something bigger (much like the scene with Minerva in the hospital earlier in the issue), it also goes back to the parallel of the series speaking to what it means to turn from fan to creator.

Gillen has said many times the series is about problematic people doing problematic things, and WicDiv #15 is no exception. With Amaterasu trying so hard to make her last years on Earth count for something, it makes her blind to people she could be hurting unintentionally. Well, not completely since she does listen to Cassandra when she tells her forming a giant fireball over Hiroshima is a really terrible idea. Still, with her time running out and her friends dropping off, it becomes a part of her own personal tragedy, which is what makes her in this issue so compelling.


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The PQ Archive: ‘Sex Criminals’ #3 Is Awesome Fuel On The Hit Fire

Oh hi, you’re probably wondering what I’m doing posting a review for an old issue of a comic. You see, I’ve decided that it’s time to save all of my reviews from my time at PopOptiq from the website that is just a hollow shell of its former self. Y’see, when the website changed EICs a little more than a year ago, the new editor decided he wanted to make the website more like Buzzfeed and then proceeded to fire most of the staff. He then also claimed copyright ownership of our work.

Well, I know I never signed a contract with you or the previous EIC that said that was okay and my name is on the byline, so…


Written by Matt Fraction
Art by Chip Zdarsky
Color Flatting by Becka Kinzie
Published by Image Comics

There’s nothing more satisfying than going back to a comic and finding the issue where everything just clicks into place. The concept, the characters, the story, and the art just start working perfectly in tandem. For Sex Criminals, Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky’s funny book about love, sex, depression, weird tentacle cum monsters, endless background dick jokes, and making fun of Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie that one time, it was definitelyissue #3. The issue is tagged with the subtitle “My Sexual Errors and Misfortunes 2001 – Present,” but it’s more commonly known as the issue where Suzie sings ‘Fat Bottomed Girls.’

The issue cover, done in cyan to go with Zdarsky’s CMYK theme for the first arc, is the first issue where the protagonists Suzie and Jon are shown together. It makes sense because this is the first time they are seen working as a unit. Getting their backstories of how they found themselves in The Quiet out of the way, Suzie and Jon start working as a pair pretty much right away. After Jon tells Suzie the story of how he lost his virginity with Morrissey analog Esteban wailing in the background, the two end their “first date” with familiar awkward moments in a fledgling relationships.

SexCrims3

The issue’s, and later the series’, greatest strength is how real the relationship between Suzie and Jon feels. The chemistry in the first issue was undeniable, but it’s the little things as they progress from a party hookup to the beginnings of an actual couple. The anxiety of waiting on a text. The little smiles at a few words on a phone. The absolute joy of feeling like just maybe this person gets you. One of the greatest strengths of Matt Fraction’s writing is how he manages to turn even the weirdest situations into the most human stories, and it shows through so hard in Sex Criminals #3. Jon and Suzie’s “alone together” moments in Cumworld (both the state of being and the shop) touch right to the soul about falling in love or at least in like a way not many other comics have achieved.

Of course, it would be remiss to not mention the issue’s centerpiece scene of Suzie singing ‘Fat Bottomed Girls.’ Even with the legal issues that kept Fraction and Zdarsky for using the lyrics, it’s hard to find fault in this scene. To have the moment where Jon realizes he’s falling for Suzie done as a choreographed musical number in a completely visual medium is a ballsy move, but Zdarsky’s gorgeous art with the color flatting assist from Becka Kinzie keep the flow of the scene perfectly as Suzie dances and sings around the pool hall dressed as what could be dubbed a “sexy Freddy Mercury” costume. The scene is through Jon’s eyes, but this scene dares the reader to not fall in love with Suzie as well as she drops all her cares to rock out to her jam. There’s also a wonderful honesty in the moments where Fraction breaks the fourth wall in the censoring captions over the lyrics. “We just keep throwing awesome-fuel on the hit-fire” seems to be the Team Sex Criminals story in one line even two years on between the constant bans from iOS and the month #11 was delayed due to the sketch covers.

The issue ends with Jon coming up with the idea that the entire comic’s premise was built on and a flash forward to just how wrong it goes. By the time the issue gets to there, it’s hard not to be invested in the heroes by then. What brings them to trying to pull off this heist and just how these two people who’ve been so alone become alone together. Everything clicks together and brings the series from a funny concept to a bizarre and honest love story complete with challenges.

It also includes so many terrible and amazing Barton Fink sex puns and the newly invented porn genre “Obamacore.” Sex Criminals is truly the hit fire that keeps on burning.


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